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‘Rogue page’ arrested at anti-Enbridge protest 0

By Michael Mui, 24 Hours Vancouver

Protester Brigette DePape is seen Tuesday being led to a police wagon after her arrest. (SUBMITTED)

Protester Brigette DePape is seen Tuesday being led to a police wagon after her arrest. (SUBMITTED)

Five anti-pipeline protesters were arrested Tuesday at the Enbridge Joint Review Panel in downtown Vancouver — including young Canadian activist Brigette DePape, a former parliamentary page who became famous for getting fired after holding up a “Stop Harper” sign in the House of Commons.

Vancouver police said the protesters, who brought whistles and “caused a disturbance,” were let in when the guest of a speaker opened a side door.

“It’s assault by trespass,” Sgt. Randy Fincham said of the recommended charges.

“When a person acting on behalf of the property asks someone to leave from a private building or private place and they refuse to abide by that request, that’s when they get arrested.”

They have all been released, though one protester said it was on condition they don’t speak with each other.

The hearings are organized for the public to present oral statements to the independent body mandated by the federal Minister of the Environment and National Energy Board. Speakers must be registered, however.

Protester Fiona De Balasi Brown said the group, composed of friends and fellow volunteer workers, hadn’t needed to navigate much security to get inside. They simply walked up to the meeting room, and the door opened. Each of the three men and two women flipped up their sweaters to show T-shirt messages such as “climate crime scene” and “stop the pipelines,” and blew whistles.

Police arrested them minutes later. De Balasi Brown has a court date scheduled early next week.

“One of the conditions of our release is we’re not allowed to speak to each other. I’m not allowed to speak with my partner who I went in with,” she said of her boyfriend.

“I’m going to be speaking with a lawyer … until then, I will be arrested — it would be against the law to speak with the person that I love.”

The youth and childcare worker said no one in her group actively resisted police. They only linked arms when asked to leave by police and hearing officials.

“I think for the people that were there, it was clear what we were trying to say,” she said.

“Although it’s called a public hearing, it’s not public. We weren’t welcome there.”

 

 

Five anti-pipeline protestors were arrested Tuesday morning at the Enbridge Joint Review Panel in downtown Vancouver. One protestor said they’ve since been released on the condition they don’t speak with each other.

Vancouver police said the protestors, who brought whistles and “caused a disturbance,” were let in when the guest of a speaker opened a side door.

The hearings are organized for the public to present oral statements for or against the pipeline to the independent body mandated by the federal Minister of the Environment and National Energy Board. Speakers must be registered, however.

“It’s assault by trespass,” Sgt. Randy Fincham said of the recommended charges.

“When a person acting on behalf of the property asks someone to leave from a private building or private place and they refuse to abide by that request, that’s when they get arrested.”

Canadian activist Brigette DePape, a former parliamentary page known for being fired from her job for holding a “Stop Harper” sign in the House of Commons, was one of the protestors arrested.

Another protestor, Fiona De Balasi Brown, said her group, made of friends and fellow volunteer workers, hadn’t needed to navigate much security to get inside. They simply walked up to the meeting room, and the door opened.

Each of the three men and two women flipped up their sweaters to show T-shirt messages such as “climate crime scene” and “stop the pipelines,” and blew whistles.

Police arrested them minutes later. De Balasi Brown has a court date scheduled early next week.

“One of the conditions of our release is we’re not allowed to speak to each other. I’m not allowed to speak with my partner who I went in with,” she said of her boyfriend.

“I’m going to be speaking with a lawyer … until then, I will be arrested — it would be against the law to speak with the person that I love.”

The youth and childcare worker said no one in her group actively resisted police. They only linked arms when asked to leave by both police and hearing officials.

“I think for the people that were there, it was clear what we were trying to say,” she said.

“Although it’s called a public hearing, it’s not public. We weren’t welcome there.”

 

 

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