Opinion Column

RCMP must be clear on role in bombing plot

By Bill Tieleman, News, Views, and Attitude – 24 hours

B.C. RCMP Assistant Commissioner Wayne Rideout (right) puts a photo on display of items used in making a bomb at a press conference at RCMP-E-Division in Surrey, British Columbia, Tuesday July 2, 2013.  RCMP arrest Amanda Korody and John Nuttall for Terrorism-related Charges, the accused tried to place an explosive device at the B.C. Legislature on Canada Day. (CARMINE MARINELLI/ 24 HOURS)

B.C. RCMP Assistant Commissioner Wayne Rideout (right) puts a photo on display of items used in making a bomb at a press conference at RCMP-E-Division in Surrey, British Columbia, Tuesday July 2, 2013. RCMP arrest Amanda Korody and John Nuttall for Terrorism-related Charges, the accused tried to place an explosive device at the B.C. Legislature on Canada Day. (CARMINE MARINELLI/ 24 HOURS)

How did John Nuttall and Amanda Korody, two disheveled, poverty-stricken drug addicts living in a Surrey basement suite and recent converts to Islam, become Canada’s biggest terrorist threat?

Two weeks after their shocking arrest on charges they allegedly planted bombs at the B.C. Legislature in Victoria July 1, there are far more troubling questions than answers from the RCMP.

But the case seems to have eerie echoes of terrorism arrests in the United States where clueless and troubled people have been convicted of deadly plots after undercover agents and informers “facilitated” their crimes to incredible degrees.

Take James Cromitie, a low-level ex-drug dealer who converted to Islam. A well-paid FBI informant befriended the Walmart worker and promised him $250,000 and a new BMW car to fire Stinger surface-to-air missiles at U.S. military planes and plant bombs at Jewish targets in New York.

“Only the government could have made a ‘terrorist’ out of Mr. Cromitie, whose buffoonery is positively Shakespearean in its scope,” said Judge Colleen McMahon who sentenced him to 25 years in jail.

With Nuttall and Korody, it’s important to state that are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

And questioning RCMP actions is not to condone illegal activity — it is necessary in a democratic society to ensure citizens have confidence in police.

So where did Nuttall and Korody get the knowledge, ability and money to allegedly build and plant potentially deadly pressure cooker bombs?

How were two people taking methadone, a drug used for heroin addicts to reduce withdrawal symptoms, able to function at such a level that necessitated a major five-month police operation?

Did RCMP undercover agents or paid informants “assist” Nuttall and Korody in their alleged plot? If so, how?

There are many more questions that may or may not be answered at Nuttall and Korody’s bail hearing Aug. 7 in B.C. Supreme Court or at their trial.

But RCMP have an obligation to lay out their case and explain their investigative tactics before Canadians should draw conclusions about how serious a terror threat this truly was.

 

 

Read more Tieleman at billtieleman.blogspot.com Email: weststar@telus.net Twitter: @BillTieleman

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poll

Are you satisfied you know enough about RCMP actions in the BC Legislature bomb case where John Nuttall and Amanda Kurody face terrorism-related charges?

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