Sports Canucks

Bruins model the answer to Canucks’ woes 0

By Guts McTavish, 24 hours Vancouver

Boston Bruins left wing Milan Lucic (17) celebrates after scoring a goal on Detroit Red Wings goalie Jonas Gustavsson (not pictured) during the third period in game five of the first round of the 2014 Stanley Cup Playoffs at TD Banknorth Garden, April 26, 2014; Boston, MA, U.S. (Photo: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports)

Boston Bruins left wing Milan Lucic (17) celebrates after scoring a goal on Detroit Red Wings goalie Jonas Gustavsson (not pictured) during the third period in game five of the first round of the 2014 Stanley Cup Playoffs at TD Banknorth Garden, April 26, 2014; Boston, MA, U.S. (Photo: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports)

If you are among the group of Vancouver Canucks fans who physically detest the Boston Bruins then I would suggest holding off eating until you've finished this column.

The Boston Bruins are the perfect NHL team.

While everyone and their dog debates the merits of putting together a fast, puck-possession team, or a group that is more big and punishing — the Bruins have created the new prototype by becoming both.

A hybrid if you will.

Hybrid has become the NHL's newest buzzword.

If Boston lives up to the bookmakers and wins a second Stanley Cup in four years, a feat duplicated by the speedy, puck-possession Chicago Blackhawks last season, then rebuilding teams who care to take the league’s temperature will have a big decision about which direction they'd like their franchises to follow.

Chicago spent a decade in the league’s basement, rewarded with a couple franchise players in Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane. It made sense to build around them the way they did.

Boston, on the other hand, built their juggernaut the old fashioned way with shrewd trades and excellent drafting.

As far as trades go, Zdena Chara and Tuukka Rask immediately come to mind.

The drafting is nothing short of spectacular. Patrice Bergeron 45th overall, Milan Lucic 50th, David Krejci 63rd and Brad Marchand 71st.

When new Canucks president Trevor Linden finally decides which style of team gives him the best shot at being competitive again, he would do well to take a long look at the Bruins organization from top to bottom.

Starting with the hiring of their assistant GM Jim Benning.

 

 

 

 

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