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Burnaby has 300 pages of pipeline questions for Kinder Morgan 0

Jeremy Nuttall

By Jeremy Nuttall, 24 hours Vancouver

Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline Westridge Marine Terminal in  Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday May 11, 2014. Burnaby council will hear more details of a 300-page document submitted to the National Energy Board regarding the proposed twinning of the Trans Mountain pipeline Monday. The city has been vocally opposed to the project. (CARMINE MARINELLI/ 24 HOURS)

Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday May 11, 2014. Burnaby council will hear more details of a 300-page document submitted to the National Energy Board regarding the proposed twinning of the Trans Mountain pipeline Monday. The city has been vocally opposed to the project. (CARMINE MARINELLI/ 24 HOURS)

Burnaby City Council wants detailed answers about the dangers of an oil spill in its backyard and how energy giant Kinder Morgan would respond to one as part of its proposal to twin the Trans Mountain pipeline.

The city sent a 300-page request for information to be forwarded to the company through the National Energy Board — part of Burnaby’s status as an intervener.

Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan did not answer a request for an interview Sunday, but last week issued a statement talking about “tremendous risks” for Burnaby from the project.

“These are critical questions that focus on the hundreds of ways in which Kinder Morgan’s proposed pipeline and tank farm would threaten our city’s safety, security and livability,” Corrigan said.

Beginning in Alberta, the Trans Mountain pipeline terminates in Burnaby and carries petroleum products to the Westridge Terminal for export to Asia. Kinder Morgan — which owns the pipeline — wants to double it and the City of Burnaby has been a vocal opponent of the idea.

“The information requests seek a response from Kinder Morgan on a broad range of issues,” reads a report to council about the submission.

The report said among the questions it is raising are technical issues, infrastructure conflicts, environmental impacts, the overall need for the project and contingency planning for oil spills. Council and the public will learn the finer details of the information request Monday.

Corrigan also took a shot at the federal government, saying its review process minimizes the chance of a proper review of such proposals.

Kinder Morgan did not respond to a request for comment Sunday.

The company has until June 13 to respond to Burnaby’s request for information.

 

 

 

 

 

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