News Local

Concepts unveiled for Lougheed facelift

By Stefania Seccia

This illustrates the gateway feature to the core area from North Road, featuring the North Road Pocket Parks, as part of the proposed Lougheed mall redevelopment.
(Artist rendering)

This illustrates the gateway feature to the core area from North Road, featuring the North Road Pocket Parks, as part of the proposed Lougheed mall redevelopment. (Artist rendering)

Burnaby’s Lougheed mall area is going to look a lot more like its own small, self-sustaining city over the next 30 years if plans are approved to significantly redevelop it with the same principles as Brentwood mall.

Shape Properties, which owns and is responsible for the massive Brentwood redevelopment, is looking for Burnaby council’s approval of its draft concept plan to allow for public consultation and input to facilitate extensive rezoning.

The 29.1 hectares of the core Lougheed area — bordered by North Road, Lougheed Highway, Bartlett Court and Cameron Street — is now made up of old commercial properties, including the mall itself, and surface parking.

But the planned change will see it broken up into seven “major character precincts,” with a focus on pedestrian, bicycle, transit and vehicular networks, gathering places in urban and naturalized settings, with office, commercial and residential components.

Not to mention up to 30 towers and townhouse podiums (12.2 million square feet of new residential floor area), ranging between 10 and up to 60 storeys, according to a staff report.

The plan includes five major public spaces built by the developer, including a “central open space” functioning as an urban park and plaza that could accommodate up to 10,000 people for special events; water features, public art, pedestrian promenades, a transit plaza with an iconic roof and a recreational trail.

“The core area is intended to continue to fulfill a commercial function, but also expand its role and become the public heart of the Lougheed community, with a variety of indoor and outdoor shopping experiences, cafes and restaurants, office space, and high-density residential opportunities, all designed around new public open spaces, plazas and tree-lined pedestrian streets,” states Lou Pelletier, director of planning and building, in his report to council.

Although it will take the next three decades to complete, three main phases of development are anticipated, with each one including public input.

Reader's comments »

By adding a comment on the site, you accept our terms and conditions