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Putin says he's not interfering with U.S. election

POSTMEDIA NETWORK

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the opening ceremony of the G-20 Summit on Sept. 4, 2016, in Hangzhou, China. (Mark Schiefelbein - Pool/Getty Images)

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the opening ceremony of the G-20 Summit on Sept. 4, 2016, in Hangzhou, China. (Mark Schiefelbein - Pool/Getty Images)

If you think the U.S. presidential election is being rigged don't look at Russian President Vladmir Putin.

Putin denies meddling in the election, but instead is accusing America of "spying on everyone and eavesdropping on everyone."

He made the accusations at an economic summit for developing countries in India, according to Breitbart.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said last week that a number of states had their election systems scanned and probed by hackers as well as cyberattacks on the Democratic National Committee, former secretary of state Colin Powell and Hillary Clinton's campaign manager, John Podesta; Russia is accused of being behind them.

Putin has previously denied allegations that Russia is the culprit.

"Hysterics have been whipped up to distract the attention of the American people from the essence of what the hackers released...For some reason nobody talks about this. They talk about who did it. Is it really important?" he told the Associated Press.

Back at the economic summit, Putin reiterated this stance.

"I want to set everyone's mind at rest, including our American friends and partners – we are not going to influence the U.S. election campaign and the answer is very simple – we don't know what will be after the U.S. presidential elections," he said, according to Breitbart.

Putin went a step further, according to a report by UPI and said that, "Russia's security works under strict guidelines while the NSA, or U.S. National Security Agency, does not."

As he was making these claims the lights in the room allegedly flickered, prompting Putin to joke, "Maybe I said something wrong."

Putin said he looked forward to improving relations with the U.S. but he also warned Western countries to "do everything to minimize civilian casualties," in the battle for Mosul.