Sports Hockey

Burgess: Canucks season like a dystopian science fiction

By Steve Burgess

Henrik Sedin #33 of Vancouver Canucks skates against Jonny Brodzinski #76 of Los Angeles Kings during the pre-season game between the Los Angeles Kings and the Vancouver Canucks at Wukesong Arena on September 23, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images )

Henrik Sedin #33 of Vancouver Canucks skates against Jonny Brodzinski #76 of Los Angeles Kings during the pre-season game between the Los Angeles Kings and the Vancouver Canucks at Wukesong Arena on September 23, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images )

Do you enjoy dystopian science fiction, weird and frightening tales of a dark and desperate future?

If so, you have a couple of entertainment options this weekend.

The movie Blade Runner 2049 is opening, with Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford. And the Vancouver Canucks open their season.

As our local NHL team launches another campaign Saturday by hosting the Edmonton Oilers, there are reasons to feel a certain degree of apocalyptic dread.

The Canucks have some hope for the future, certainly. Perhaps they will return to glory before rising temperatures turn our oceans to steam and make indoor ice-making very tricky.

But patience has its limits. Will the Canucks be good again before we old-timers die?

This year's Canucks have some first-rate prospects—or perhaps using the plural would require two Brock Boesers.

But the team does boast solid young players like Bo Horvat and Markus Granlund, and some exciting youngsters in the pipeline like Jonathan Dahlen and Elias Pettersson. Still, this is a souffle that has yet to rise and may yet collapse half-baked.

What if Olli Juolevi continues his smooth, steady progress to Bustville? What if the Nikolay Goldobin story continues to take one scoring chance forward, three defensive lapses back? Do the Canucks have a future powerhouse or a deep pool of lukewarm bath water?

Final cuts this week included Jayson Megna and Michael Chaput. On Twitter, Canucks fans cheered their departure. Cold.

It's got to hurt when news of your demotion to Utica is greeted by Canucks faithful pretty much the same way the Munchkins reacted when the Wicked Witch of the West was turned into a puddle.

Megna and Chaput don't deserve the abuse—they are hard-working players just trying to contribute.

But for a lot of fans their reliable presence in the Vancouver lineup last season came to symbolize the overall state of the Canucks, a team that couldn't make up its mind to build for the future.

If Chaput and Megna are the Canucks future, it will be a future with plenty of parking spots available at Rogers Arena.

We all want a better tomorrow, and when people talk about the future they often say we have to make a better world for our children.

But I don't have kids, so to hell with them. I just want to see a Stanley Cup parade on Robson before I croak.

After that, go ahead and let the oceans boil.