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Fire crews battle blaze at mansion in Vancouver's Shaughnessy

Stephanie Ip, Vancouver Sun

Firefighters were on-site early Sunday morning in Vancouver's Shaughnessy neighbourhood for a fire at 3737 Angus Dr., seen here in a realty video screengrab. (YouTube video screenshot/<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrP9CJx2mis" target="_blank">Lorne Goldman</a>)

Firefighters were on-site early Sunday morning in Vancouver's Shaughnessy neighbourhood for a fire at 3737 Angus Dr., seen here in a realty video screengrab. (YouTube video screenshot/Lorne Goldman)

More than 50 firefighters were called to help put out a fire at a massive vacant heritage mansion in Vancouver’s Shaughnessy neighbourhood early Sunday morning.

The fire, located at 3737 Angus Dr., was first reported to Vancouver Fire and Rescue around 2:45 a.m. Sunday.

When crews arrived on scene, Asst. Fire Chief Dan Stroup said flames from the three-alarm blaze were already “through the roof” of the home, which made it difficult to get under control.

A total of 55 firefighters and 12 rigs were called on to battle the fire. The last of the crews finally left the site just before 3 p.m. Sunday.

“We had crews on scene all day looking for hot spots,” said Stroup, who could not comment on whether the fire is suspicious.

There were no injuries and the fire was contained to the one property. An adjacent home sustained only minor water damage.

The property at 3737 Angus Dr. was first built in 1910 by then-noted Vancouver architectural firm Maclure and Fox for financial agent Frank Rounsefell and his family. The Rounsefell’s moved from the West End to Shaughnessy in about 1913.

It features five bedrooms over 9,790 square-feet of living space.

The home and property is protected from demolition under the First Shaughnessy Heritage Conservation Area, a City of Vancouver policy to protect pre-1940s homes in the area.

Vancouver historian John Atkin said it’s a shame the well-maintained and carefully restored home has been badly damaged.

Atkin called it an “important part of the Angus Drive streetscape.”

“It’s hard to retain heritage in the city and fire like this doesn’t help,” Atkin said.

“The updates were in character and done with respect. It was a good example of retention and updates.”

Atkin said under the city’s policy to protect heritage homes in Shaughnessy, a home could be demolished if over 60% of it is damaged by fire. If the damage is to less than 60% of the home then the policy states that it should be retained.

In 2013, the home was sold after being listed for $13.7 million. Last year, the home was assessed at a value of $14 million and earlier this year, it was again listed for sale.

A rental listing for the home was also found online through a property management company. The home was listed as available to rent for $12,000 a month.