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MLB ump saves woman's life with CPR 0

REUTERS
Yan Gomes of the Toronto Blue Jays talks to home plate umpire Jim Joyce during MLB game action against the New York Yankees on August 11, 2012 at the Rogers Centre in Toronto. Joyce is being credited with saving an Arizona stadium employee's life this week. (AFP)

Yan Gomes of the Toronto Blue Jays talks to home plate umpire Jim Joyce during MLB game action against the New York Yankees on August 11, 2012 at the Rogers Centre in Toronto. Joyce is being credited with saving an Arizona stadium employee's life this week. (AFP)

In his 24 years of service Jim Joyce has undoubtedly made some poor calls.

Having umpired multiple MLB all-star games, playoff games and a pair of World Series, no game was more important than Monday’s in Arizona.

Joyce may have saved the life of a Diamondbacks employee by administering CPR before Monday’s game, CBSSports.com reported.

About 90 minutes before the game, Joyce, 56, and the other umpires were walking up the tunnel leading to the umpires’ dressing room at the Diamondbacks stadium when they saw a woman on the ground having a seizure.

Joyce, who learned CPR in high school, made sure that the woman’s head was protected but realized something more was wrong, so he began administering CPR.

Paramedics arrived while Joyce was administering CPR, but the use of a defibrillator did not revive the woman.

Joyce continued administering CPR while the paramedics used the defibrillator again, and this time the woman began breathing.

“It was non-normal,” Joyce told CBSSports.com Tuesday afternoon. “I don’t know what word to put on it. It’s obviously never happened to me before.”

Joyce said he had used CPR before, but not in many years.

Joyce was scheduled to be the plate umpire Monday, but the other umpires asked if he wanted to umpire third base instead because of the emotional moment. Joyce declined and remained behind the plate.

“It was very emotional, I’ll be honest with you,” he said. “But I didn’t want to go to third base because just standing there, literally, 'the incident~ is all I would have thought about all night. I wouldn’t have been able to think about anything else.”

Joyce was the umpire who missed a call at first base that prevented the Tigers’ Armando Galarraga from completing a perfect game against the Indians in 2010.

During a Blue Jays game last week in Toronto a fan who went into cardiac arrest died in hospital.

The game was stopped for four minutes at the Rogers Centre with the Jays at bat until the 60-year-old fan was taken out of the stadium on a stretcher.

It was the second medical emergency of its kind at the Rogers Centre this season.

 


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