Peter Epp, Postmedia Network

Peter Epp has worked as a reporter, photographer and editor for community newspapers in Petrolia, Dresden, Bothwell and Chatham since 1979. He was also editor of the Voice of the Farmer newspaper group from 1986 to 1996, and editor of Farm Market (Today's Farmer) from 1997 to 2011. An occasional automotive history columnist, Peter was born and raised in St. Catharines. Contact Peter at 519-351-7331, ext. 248, or via e-mail at peter.epp@sunmedia.ca.

Stories

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, along with Ontario Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault, announce cuts to hydro rates on average of 25 per cent during a press conference in Toronto on March 2, 2017. (Ernest Doroszuk/Toronto Sun/Postmedia Network)

Grits' hydro bill plan uses worn-out tactic

The Ontario Liberals are using little imagination in their plan to lower electricity bills. To achieve a 17 per cent cut this summer, the government will simply do what it has done for the better part of the past decade -- push the expense down the road while creating additional debt.

Pedestrians walk on McGill College Avenue in Montreal, Feb. 8, 2012. (Vincenzo D'Alto/THE MONTREAL GAZETTE)

Urban concentration exacerbates burdens

Wednesday's gleanings from the 2016 Canadian census provide a deep look at the nation's population growth and where that growth is occurring. But what's fascinating is how dramatic the growth has been, which more or less confirms what demographers have known for some time about Canada's big cities.

U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands as he meets with Republican President-elect Donald Trump (L) on transition planning in the Oval Office at the White House on November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. (JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Words are powerful, choose them wisely

U.S. President Barack Obama demonstrated enormous grace and restraint when he met with ­president-elect Donald Trump at the White House, but Obama's healing words haven't been the intended balm in the aftermath of the American election, as demonstrations and protests continue in the United States.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau speaks during a press conference during the annual International Monetary Fund, World Bank Spring Meetings at the IMF on April 15, 2016 in Washington, D.C. (MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Fed Grits $81B vow ignores Ontario's tale

The federal Liberals are not unlike the New Democrats who governed Ontario 25 years ago. In the midst of economic difficulties and financial challenges, the Liberals are committed to deficit-­financing billions upon billions of dollars on infrastructure and other programs.

This file photo taken on February 27, 2015 shows U.S. President Barack Obama looking through a teleprompter during a ceremony for outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. (YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)

Talk of a third term for Obama nonsense

The mood in the United States regarding the character of both presidential candidates is somewhat gloomy and quite unprecedented, and has led to speculation about a third term for President Barack Obama.

Cows attached to milker units at the London Dairy Farm in London, Ont., in this file photo. (DEREK RUTTAN/File photo/Postmedia Network)

Bernier's milk stance well worth cryin' over

Maxime Bernier is sticking with his principles, even if those principles would require dismantling an agricultural system that has mostly served Canadian producers and their consumers well.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (L) is welcomed by his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe upon his arrival at Abe's official residence in Tokyo, Japan, May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Toru Yamanaka/Pool

'Ranch time' request reflects national need

In early 1981, just two months after his election as U.S. president, Ronald Reagan was examining a crowded weekly schedule that had been developed by his White House staff, and he pointed to an omission.

Federal Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, left, has his hand held aloft by Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne at a Liberal rally held at the Daniels Spectrum in Toronto on August 17, 2015. (Jack Boland/Toronto Sun/Postmedia Network)

Wynne and Trudeau best buds -- for now

Monday's federal election was historic for so many reasons, but what can't be forgotten is the impact on Ontario for the next three years.

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau (R) shakes hands with New Democrat Party leader Thomas Mulcair before the gay pride parade in Toronto, June 30, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Don’t count out a coalition just yet

Nobody knows what will happen this fall when Canadians go to the polls to elect a new federal government, but one thing is certain: If the Conservatives are reduced to minority status, the possibility of a coalition between the Liberals and New Democrats will be raised, but that possibility might be, well, awkward.

Water collection reservoirs are pictured empty in Palmdale, California April 7, 2015. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Climate change or not, water a vital resource

California’s water shortage is redefining that state’s name. Once believed a modern paradise, California is now being defined by its name’s origins — furnace or kiln. The state is on high alert as it enters its fourth year of drought, and water restrictions have been imposed for the first time in its history.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waves to supporters at the party headquarters in Tel Aviv March 18, 2015. Netanyahu claimed victory in Israel's election after exit polls showed he had erased his center-left rivals' lead with a hard rightward shift in which he abandoned a commitment to negotiate a Palestinian state. REUTERS/Amir Cohen

Fear factor becoming key to election wins

Fear works. Just ask Benjamin Netanyahu. The Israeli prime minister and his political colleagues won re-election Tuesday, despite polls suggesting he and the Likud Party were a spent force.

(Postmedia Network)

Vaccination vital tool to keep us all healthy

Childhood illnesses such as measles, mumps and whooping cough haven’t been on the public radar for a generation or so, thanks mostly to immunization and public health education. Yet four cases of measles have been identified in Toronto, and over 100 cases in 14 states in the U.S., and health officials are now expressing worry.

Sir John A. Macdonald, the first prime minister of Canada.

It’s time we gave Sir John A. his due

It’s taken too long to give Sir John A. Macdonald recognition he deserves on his birth date, but at least some acknowledgement will be made this Sunday. It will be the 200th anniversary of the birth of Macdonald, Canada’s first prime minister and the most important public figure in 19th-century Canada.

Cars drive past the U.S. Interests Section, in Havana December 17, 2014. U.S. President Barack Obama was set to announce a shift in policy toward Cuba on Wednesday and the Associated Press reported the changes would include the opening of an embassy in Cuba and the start of talks to normalize relations. REUTERS/Stringer

No reason not to have U.S.-Cuba relations

The U.S. government’s plan to normalize relations with Cuba is long overdue, especially since the Americans have had an immense economic relationship with Communist China for many years, even extending the olive branch to the Soviet Union in the early 1970s, if only for a moment.

A depot used to store pipes for TransCanada Corp's planned Keystone XL oil pipeline is seen in Gascoyne, North Dakota November 14, 2014. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

Keystone plays part in oil world's big shift

While American senators were voting down legislation Tuesday that would permit the Keystone XL pipeline to be built in the U.S., two Americans were in Ottawa for the Canadian launch of a task force that wants to strengthen the energy relationship among Canada, the U.S. and Mexico.